Concentrating Solar Power Projects Showed Growth in 2009

April 15, 2010

From: Power-Gen Worldwide

15 April 2010 — Three new concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities came online in the United States in 2009, the third year in the past four such facilities were added following 15 years of inactivity.

The 5 MWac Sierra SunTower from eSolar, the 2 MWac Holaniku trough from Sopogy and the 5 MWac Kimberlina linear Fresnel system from Areva Solar (formerly Ausra) came online during 2009. The Sierra SunTower is the first power tower operating in the U.S. in a decade and Holaniku is the first CSP facility to come online in Hawaii.

The 2009 CSP market summary was released April 15 by the Solar Energy Industries Association.

Also last year, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced two initiatives to speed the development of solar energy on public lands. First, four Renewable Energy Coordination Offices were established across the west (in California, Nevada, Wyoming and Arizona), along with renewable energy teams in five other offices. Second, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) identified 14 solar energy projects that were in position to qualify for stimulus-related funding, if permitted during 2010. BLM and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service have focused their resources on getting these “fast-track” projects through the permitting process so they can commence construction by Dec.31, 2010.

The trade association said the United States now has 432 MW of operational CSP plants in commercial production (as of March 2010), making it the world leader in installed CSP. At least three additional CSP facilities are likely to come online in 2010: a 2 MWac Stirling dish installation in Phoenix, Ariz., a 4 MWth trough plant displacing coal-fired generation in Grand Junction, Colo. and the 75 MW Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center hybrid trough in Martin County, Fla.

Sopogy Features Solar Hybrid Electricity & H20 System

April 13, 2010

Posted by Joanna Schroeder – April 13th, 2010

Sopogy, Inc. has partnered with Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida to showcase its SopoNova solar panels. The project, developed by STG International, has been designed to be a model for cost-effective, stand alone solar power solutions for health clinics in Africa.

According to the company, the MicroCSP system generates solar energy by reflecting the sun’s energy from mirrors into a receiver tube, heating a transfer fluid to create steam. The steam then spins a turbine that drives a generator and produces electricity. The system also includes storage for use on cloudy and rainy days.

“A particularly important breakthrough has been Sopogy’s development of smaller scale parabolic trough collectors that can be built at a lower cost, using commonly available manufacturing facilities and conventional materials,” says Tal Ziv, VP of Operations at Sopogy. “Not only can our modules be produced locally, but our collectors can also be manufactured anywhere in the world.”

One of the features that makes the system unique is that it combines both solar energy to produce electricity and hot water. This system will provide three kilowatts of electricity, enough to power a health clinic that sees up to 100 patients a day as well as produce up to 300 litres of hot water for clinic use.

“This project exemplifies the efforts of organizations committed to environmental sustainability,” said Darren T. Kimura, CEO of Sopogy. “Sopogy is proud to focus on the triple bottom line using our technology to create local jobs, generating green energy, while staying focused on our business.”

related topics: Electricity, News, Solar

Sopogy Micro-scaled Concentrating Solar Power System to Power Up Florida College

April 6, 2010

St. Petersburg, FloridaMarch 23, 2010 - Sopogy, Inc., manufacturer of the proprietary micro-scaled concentrating solar power (MicroCSP) system, is demonstrating its SopoNova™ solar panels at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida. The project developed by STG International (previously known as Solar Turbine Group) is designed to be a model for cost effective, stand alone solar power solutions for health clinics in Africa.

The MicroCSP system generates thermal energy by reflecting the sun’s energy from mirrors into a receiver tube, heating a transfer fluid to create steam. The steam spins a turbine which drives a generator and produces electricity. The system also includes thermal energy storage that allows power to be produced during cloudy periods.

Sopogy’s solar collectors feature a proprietary frame and storm protection, keeping the system safe during weather events that could include flying debris from hurricane strength winds. All components are also enclosed in an aerodynamic, rust-resistant housing which makes Sopogy’s collectors suitable for use in climates ranging from deserts to tropical environments.

“A particularly important breakthrough has been Sopogy’s development of smaller scale parabolic trough collectors that can be built at a lower cost, using commonly available manufacturing facilities and conventional materials,” says Tal Ziv, VP of Operations at Sopogy. “Not only can our modules be produced locally, but our collectors can also be manufactured anywhere in the world.”

The system is a hybrid electricity and hot water system.  It will provide three kilowatts of electricity, enough to power a multi-building health clinic that treats between 50 and 100 patients per day in Lesotho, as well as produce up to 300 liters of hot water for staff and clinician use.

Other project collaborators include Krinner Ground Screws, the Florida Green Builders Coalition and Water Oak Development Group.

“This project exemplifies the efforts of organizations committed to environmental sustainability,” said Darren T. Kimura, CEO of Sopogy. “Sopogy is proud to focus on the triple bottom line using our technology to create local jobs, generating green energy, while staying focused on our business,” he adds.

Sopogy’s MicroCSP technologies are being deployed around the world including United States, the Middle East, Europe, Asia and Hawaii.  The unique scalability and modularity of MicroCSP make it ideal for distributed generation applications such as electricity, process heating and solar air-conditioning.  Sopogy has engineering partners throughout the globe, who are certified to help develop and construct solar plants in their specific regions.

About Sopogy
Sopogy specializes in MicroCSP™ solar technologies that bring the economics of large solar energy systems to the industrial, commercial and utility sectors in a smaller, robust and more cost effective package. Sopogy’s goal is to create solar solutions that improve the quality of life and simplify the solar power business.  Please visit www.sopogy.org for more information.

About STG International
Previously operating as the Solar Turbine Group, STG International is a non-profit organization based in Cambridge, Massachusetts whose mission is to provide technical, financial and intellectual support, assistance, and training to projects and organizations focused on bringing sustainable energy technologies to communities across the developing world.  Please visit www.stginternational.org for more information.

Contact: Dy Phung
Marketing and Public Relations Coordinator
Sopogy, Inc.
dphung@sopogy.org
808-237-2422